Huawei MateBook 13 review: Hands-on

The MateBook 13 is the nearest you can get into some MacBook Air running Windows – for much less money.
It might seem cliché to compare with the MateBook 13 into the MacBook Air, but it is difficult not to. With this kind of similar layouts there is little to inform the notebooks aside on aesthetics and the moment you consider the internals Huawei’s notebook brings sharply ahead.
The only real compromises have been about webcam image quality and battery lifetime, although the latter might be a deal breaker for anyone seriously considering shifting out of San Cupertino.
That is even more reason to be enthused about the MateBook 13, that claims to deliver the identical style at a more rapid price.

The MateBook 13 is expected from the US from 29 January and will charge $999 for the foundation version – that comprises a Core i5 chip and 256GB storage or $1,299 for a superior version using an i7, 512GB storage, and also different images in the kind of Nvidia’s MX150.

Considering the MacBook Air begins from #1,199/$1,199 to get a version with significantly less storage than Huawei’s, while the XPS 13 begins from #999/$899 to an i3 chip, which pricing is currently quite competitive.
Huawei has not yet announced pricing or release dates to the UK and other areas, but we would be amazed the UK must wait much more compared to the US to get our hands on it.

If you have seen some of Huawei’s recent notebooks afterward the MateBook 13 will look immediately recognizable. There is the exact same choice of gray or silver finishes, together with nominal bezels, a grand touchpad, and all-metal structure.

That’s partially what’s going to fuel the inevitable comparisons to the new Air, and also the MateBook comes out amazingly well.
It is a squarer, boxier format than you may be accustomed to, which ends in a lot of if you see films or TV, but leaves one plenty of vertical screen real estate if you are working or surfing the internet. That makes it perfect as a work apparatus, if less optimum for curling up in bed with Netflix.

In 1.3kg it is not super lightweight, and it is where the corners were cut to maintain that cost down. That makes it the exact same weight as the bigger MateBook X Guru – that has a 13.9in screen and a larger battery to warrant the size – although in fairness it is still only fractionally thicker than its Apple rival.
That slender construct does include the customary price though: vents are restricted, with two USB-C vents (one for charging) and a headphone jack. Expect to want dongles aplenty in the event that you aspire to join anything else to it.

Specs are amazingly impressive for the cost, and that is the place where the MateBook 13 really brings from the Apple and Dell equivalents.
The 1,299 premium version is arguably much greater value – not only does this get you the i7 and double click the storage, however, the leap into a MX150 graphics card makes this one of the most economical ways to get a discrete graphics card at an ultra book on the market. The only real drawback here is that the RAM – 8GB is not poor, but it lags behind the remaining specs, and might put off anyone expecting to use it to get suitable movie or picture editing on the move.

The webcam can be a small letdown. That is the type of compromise I would be perfectly pleased to make however for anyone regularly with their notebook for video calls it is very likely to feel as a real restriction.
Battery life can be a small concern. I use the first MateBook X because my everyday notebook, also there are a great deal of things that I love about it, but battery life is not one of these. The MateBook 13 includes a similar ability, and while Huawei asserts it could support 10 hours of movie playback, I will not consider it until we could check it out for ourselves.

The 1,299 premium version is arguably much greater value – not only does this get you the i7 and double click the storage, however, the leap into a MX150 graphics card makes this one of the most economical ways to get a discrete graphics card at an ultra book on the market. The only real drawback here is that the RAM – 8GB is not poor, but it lags behind the remaining specs, and might put off anyone expecting to use it to get suitable movie or picture editing on the move.

The webcam can be a small letdown. That is the type of compromise I would be perfectly pleased to make however for anyone regularly with their notebook for video calls it is very likely to feel as a real restriction.
Battery life can be a small concern. I use the first MateBook X because my everyday notebook, and there are a great deal of things that I love about it, however, battery life is not one of them. The MateBook 13 includes a similar ability, and while Huawei asserts it could support 10 hours of movie playback, I will not believe it before we could check it out for ourselves.

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